That wouldn’t love to be that winner you see on TV holding a great big sweepstakes check?

That wouldn’t love to be that winner you see on TV holding a great big sweepstakes check?

That’s what con performers are relying upon if they claim become Publishers Clearing House. This trick is an oldie but g die for scammers.

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The scam starts by having a call or letter saying you’ve won the Publishers Clearing home sweepstakes. But to gather your award, they do say, you will need to send money to cover fees and fees. Typically you’ll be asked to deliver money by Western Union or MoneyGram, or by getting a card that is reloadable present card. Scammers ask you to spend these methods because it’s extremely difficult to trace the cash — and you’ll almost never have it back.

But that’s not the only method scammers have this scam to your money. Some will send you a realistic-l king fake check in the mail. You’re told that, to claim your reward, you will need to deposit the check and deliver some of the money back for made-up costs. Nevertheless when the check you deposit bounces — even with it seemed to clear — you may be regarding the h k your money can buy you sent.

You’ve won a prize, here are a few things to know if you think